Sonnet 130 analysis

Sonnet carries within it similar themes to those traditional sonnets - Female Beauty, The Anatomy and Love - but it approaches them in a thoroughly realistic way; there is no flowery, idealistic language.

Sonnet 130 thesis statement

The last comparison is made with a goddess, which is probably the highest thing a woman can be compared with. He loves her for what the reality is, and not because he can compare her to beautiful things. Share this:. The eyes of the mistress are compared with the sun, but they have not even a likeness with it. How to cite this article: Shakespeare, William. For example, it was not uncommon to read love poems that compared a woman to a river, or the sun. In one sonnet the only reason the speaker loves his woman is because she looks beautiful, and in the other the speaker loves her although she does not look handsome in the eyes of most men. Manchester: Carcanet Press, Women were supposed to delight men with a lovely face and body. The speaker is not talking for somebody else, but for himself and his own mistress. Sonnet mocks the typical Petrarchan metaphors by presenting a speaker who seems to take them at face value, and somewhat bemusedly, decides to tell the truth. By contrast, poets who compare their lovers to nature are not really describing them as they are, but idealizing them — and therefore, the poet seems to hint, they cannot love their beloved as much as he loves his mistress. Imagine that, comparing your lover's hair to strands of thin metal. One final note: To Elizabethan readers, Shakespeare's comparison of hair to 'wires' would refer to the finely-spun gold threads woven into fancy hair nets.

So little record of his private life exists that most of what people know about Shakespeare stems from scholarly discussion and speculation, rather than actual records or facts.

Sonnet mocks the typical Petrarchan metaphors by presenting a speaker who seems to take them at face value, and somewhat bemusedly, decides to tell the truth.

Those colours are linked with femaleness. By contrast, poets who compare their lovers to nature are not really describing them as they are, but idealizing them — and therefore, the poet seems to hint, they cannot love their beloved as much as he loves his mistress.

sonnet 130 analysis literary devices

In this sense sonnet is an anomaly, a unique poem that flouts the rules of convention and breaks new ground in the process. The rhetorical structure of Sonnet is important to its effect.

Sonnet 130 analysis

Folcroft: Folcroft Press, If you compare the stanzas of Astrophel and Stella to Sonnet , you will see exactly what elements of the conventional love sonnet Shakespeare is light-heartedly mocking. The sun as one of the most important elements for life on earth is a really high level for comparison. In the sonnets, Petrarch praises her beauty, her worth, and her perfection using an extraordinary variety of metaphors based largely on natural beauties. In lines three and four the anatomy of the mistress is further explored in unorthodox fashion. The sonnet: its origin, structure, and place in poetry. Shakespeare Online References Petrarca, Francesco. The mistress's imperfections are praised and by so doing it could be argued that the speaker is being more honest. So little record of his private life exists that most of what people know about Shakespeare stems from scholarly discussion and speculation, rather than actual records or facts. She doesn't have rosy cheeks, even if the speaker has seen plenty of natural damask roses in the garden.

Petrarch, the first modern scholar and man of letters. Perfumes smell sweeter than the breath that comes out of her mouth.

sonnet 130 analysis essay

Amanda Mabillard.

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Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet